Lough Ramor

Wildlife Lough Ramor….

A fantastic and very interesting place to observe birds of all kinds throughout the year is Lough Ramor. In winter a good numbers of Waders and Swans winter on the lake.

For example, Grey Crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Grey Herons of which there is a large nesting colony on the big island. Mute Swans, Whooper Swans, Mallard, Wigeon, Pochard, Teal, Golden Eye, Tufted Duck, Moorhen (commonly known as Water Hen), Golden Plover, Lapwing, Snipe, Cormorant, Common Gulls, Greater Blacked Gull and Lesser Black Backed Gulls and a favourite of Birdwatchers the magnificent Blue Kingfisher.

Desmond Connors a well respected photographer in the area has captured amazing shots. To see some of his work click here


 

Watersports……

Ramor Watersports Club founded in August 2009; Our Clubhouse is located at Lakeside Manor Hotel Virginia, A good cross section of Watersports enthusiasts are represented Sailing, Fishing, Waterskiing, Windsurfing, Wakeboarding, Canoeing and Swimming.

For more information visit Ramorwatersportsclub.com


 

Fishing…..

Lough Ramor which is within a stone’s through of the hotel is the biggest lake in the area at 800 hectares. It is quite shallow at its southern end but depths in excess of 15m have been recorded around the northern end of the lake. This is an excellent pike fishery.

Large pike have re-established themselves in the lake and many 20lb fish are frequently recorded. Virginia, Coronagh, Knocknagartan, the Nine-eyed bridge and the back of the GAA football field are all notable venues at the southern end of the lake. Access by the hotel on the Virginia to Kells road along with a number of other access points in the area. It welcomes fishermen from Ireland & the UK with some well known names making appearances.

BYE-LAW NO. 862 of 2009 provides for catch and release in respect of coarse fish in the harbour area of Lough Ramor.The Bye-law also prohibits the possession of any coarse fish or keep net in, or on the banks of, the harbour area and provides for the use of single barbless hooks only in angling for coarse fish.

For more information visit FishingCavan.com